Friday, 5 March 2010

Albert Owen and the IPC

As was reported in the Daily Post, the first of many large infrastructure projects to be decided upon by the Infrastructure Planning Commission (IPC) will be on Ynys Mon; Wylfa B and the Offshore Windfarm. There is a general agreement that this unelected quango will take decision making away from local authorities and limit consultation with local people.

Perhaps the people of Ynys Mon would like to know that their esteemed MP, Albert Owen voted AYE on the third reading of the Planning Act 2008, which created the IPC. The vote took place on the 25th June 2008 with the Government winning the vote 280 to 198. There was total opposition to the bill by the Conservatives, Liberal Democrats and Plaid Cymru, but 6 rebel Labour MP's voted against their government, this included one Welsh Labour MP, Paul Flynn.

I very much hope that the people of Ynys Mon remember where Albert Owen's loyalty really lies when he's on the campaign trail preaching on local issues.

Needless to say that our ultra loyal Brownite/Blairite MP, Ian Lucas also voted with his government and against the public interest on this issue.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Just to note that the people of Ynys Mon (including the Plaid Cymry candidate) are generally in favour of Wylfa B. I'm not sure what's your point!

Anonymous said...

Owen isn't the only one.
The oh-so effective Lib Dem MP for Ceredigion is now going around opposing windfarms, but didn't actually turn up to vote on the IPC.
Stable-door...
Horse...
Bolted..

Alwyn ap Huw said...

Because the people of Ynys Mon are generally in favour of Wylfa B then Anglesey council would probably grant planning permission for its development. The IPC could refuse such permission without regard of the views of the local people and their elected councillors. That is much the point of the undemocratic nature about the IPC as is the body being able to force developments on communities against their wishes.

caebrwyn said...

Apologies for the slightly different angle but just wondered if anyone had seen the piece in Private Eye re IPC and the business interests of it's Chief Executive. I have mentioned it here;
http://carmarthenplanning.blogspot.com/2010/03/infrastructure-planning-commission.html

Plaid Gwersyllt said...

Caebrwyn - Diolch am hyn, diddorol iawn.

Dr Carl Iwan Clowes said...

As someone who lives on Ynys Mon,it is a misconception that the people of the island are wholly supportive of Wylfa B. Certainly, in my daily contacts at various levels I see very little enthusiasm for it. Support initially emanated from a blind leap of faith - with nothing on the table - by the previous leader of the Council. Once committed, it was difficult for the Council to renege but what did they vote for - a nuclear waste dump in their midst for 160years as we now know to be the case or the creation of a legitimate target for a disaffected terrorist, a blow to tourism for the north of the island or a project to devastate several environmental sites of internationally important significance ? Politicians at all levels have followed like lemmings for one reason - employment. This is the county with the lowest GVA in Britain. So, the case is clear ! You put the people on their knees until they accept whatever is offered. Fortunately, there is some optimism on the horizon as new technologies relating to aternative energies are developed. The recent announcements in relation to off-shore wind turbines producing a quarter of the UK`s energy needs, possibilities of turbine tower production on the former site at Anglesey Aluminium, tidal and current proposals all offer hope on a scale compatible with the talents of the island and with the employment needs of the Monwysion.
The case for Wylfa B is far from accepted nor has it been won. There are many steps to go before it sees the light of day, not least the technology of the Westinghouse and Areva proposal has still to be proven and accepted by the Nuclear Inspectorate. Meanwhile green energy is moving apace and gaining ground as buy-in tariffs come to play.